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Bengal Cinematheque presents the films and ideas of cinema’s greatest auteurs

Date: Sat 05 Dec 2015 - Sun 06 Dec 2015

Inauguration: Sat 05 Dec 2015 at 07:00 PM

Venue:Daily Star-Bengal Arts Precinct

Bengal Cinematheque presents the films and ideas of cinema’s greatest auteurs, shown at the highest quality, to encourage a community of emerging film-makers, writers and programmers in Bangladesh.
Doors close at 7:00pm. Free entry
“The art of living has no history: it does not evolve: the pleasure which vanishes vanishes for good, there is no substitute for it. Other pleasures come, which replace nothing.”
― Roland Barthes, Roland Barthes
Every film is historical—burnt into the untouchable, impossible past. A collection of gone moments listing an earnest index of our desires. Yet, the immediate experience of film, it’s revivification with light and movement, seems so real and so sincere that it lulls you. You are unprepared for the oncoming melancholia, the rise of that archaic anger. Cajoled into a re-animated past, when the ontological echo of the image fades, we journey back to the incoherent present, desolate and worse, full of nascent hope. Formless, in the quiet dark, as we collect our things, we long for more hallucinations, more time with what we have lost, and those who have lost us. The light outside the theatre is blinding and sad. The third cycle of Bengal Cinematheque inflames our greed for the traumas and pleasures of our past and then reveals to us their brutal, unbridgeable distance.


5 December 2015, 7:00pm Saturday

Hiroshima Mon Amour (Resnais) 1959, 92 minutes, black and white

An atom bomb burns off the bodies and faces of a city's inhabitants. Something like scarring is a leitmotif. A French woman mechanically commits adultery yet in the moment it feels newborn, sentimental, languorous. There are caresses, and the gentle traversal of bodies and breathes. She leans into her Japanese lover. Exhilarated, he won’t let go, and to pass the time they wander around Hiroshima, which unfurls like a surreal dream. She implodes with shame and loss. They feel differently: a pressing, combinatory weight. Time branches out into various possibilities. Yet, even the truth is not enough and nothing stops, it just goes on and on. Love is of course a kind of permanent state of deformation. They become geography.

6 December 2015, 7:00pm Sunday

Rear Window (Hitchcock) 1954, 115 minutes, colour

A man who is always running around, trying to hurt himself, is confined to his apartment. Distraught and wild, he ignores the domesticating solicitations and cravings of his girlfriend. From his rear window he voyeurises city life: atomisation, banality, ease and loneliness. He fantasises about crime and murder to ease time. His girlfriend plays along in an attempt to burrow further into his life. Threats gather and we oscillate between play and accident. In the end he sacrifices safety and certainty in an attempt to feel something other than the suffocations of reality. It is unclear whether he realises that the greatest threat to others is he, himself.

Bengal Cinematheque presents the films and ideas of cinema’s greatest auteurs, shown at the highest quality, to encourage a community of emerging film-makers, writers and programmers in Bangladesh.
Doors close at 7:00pm. Free entry
“The art of living has no history: it does not evolve: the pleasure which vanishes vanishes for good, there is no substitute for it. Other pleasures come, which replace nothing.”
― Roland Barthes, Roland Barthes
Every film is historical

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Getting Here

Location

Address:

  • Daily Star-Bengal Arts Precinct

    The Daily Star Centre, 64-65 Kazi Nazrul Islam Avenue Kawran Bazaar, Dhaka 1215


    Tel: (+88) 09666773312
    Mob: (+88) 01610446622